Design a Security Intrusion System

Peak Alarm is the Leader in Utah

Step by Step Process to design a security intrusion system by Larry Love with Peak Alarm Larry@peakalarm.com www.peakalarm.com (801)428 1384

1. Pick a control panel that will meet the needs of the project. It should be expandable.
2. Decide how many arm/disarm stations they will need and the locations.
3. Pick the communication method such as Internet, Phone, Cellular or Radio with the understanding that some methods are more reliable than others.

4. Add the needed devices to the system such as motion detectors, glass break detection, door contact status switches on man or overhead doors and roof hatches etc…
You can install beam detectors along one side of a warehouse to cover all the overheads rather than contacting each overhead and there are pros and cons so discuss with the customer.
There are new tri-tech detectors which cost a bit more but are less apt to false alarm and placing trap motions a specific points in the facility can also be beneficial.

5. Discuss whether or not to include a siren or lights for when the system goes into alarm.
6. Think through the possibility of a burglar getting past the first level of security if they cut through the glass on a glass door and bypass the door status switch.
7. Design the system to meet the budget needs and other needs of the customer.
8. Discuss the features of the new systems explaining the benefits of arming and disarming different areas separately. Example: Warehouse employees cannot disarm the office etc…
9. Discuss the possibility of adding humidity, water, temperature and other types of sensors to the system to alert the owner of issues with their server rooms or other areas.
10. Go over the different programming features such as programming specific doors to be alarmed 24 hours if people should not be going in or out those doors. (Emergency Exits)
11. Explain the benefits of adding cameras with recorders to the system for video and using the video as positive training aids for accidents and as a deterrent.
12. Telling an employee you appreciate that they cleaned up a certain area without being told and telling them I saw what you did on the camera system helps get the word out your watching.
13. Is a lift needed because of the height of the building and who will rent the lift the owner or the security contractor.
14. Is there any high voltage that needs to be done and who will hire the electrical contractor to put specific items such as outlets in that may be needed?
15. When you get to a certain number of powered devices you may need an additional power supply so plan ahead by doing the current draw.
16. In large buildings the type and size of the cable will be important for voltage line drop and if the ceiling is a plenum rated ceiling or not is also important.

Meet with the owner to discuss their special needs including size of the project and special requirement due to height of building, if trenching is needed, conduit or special cable.

This list is not meant to be all inclusive although it will give you a good list of items to discuss as a customer or security professional.

If you have any suggestions, corrections please contact Larry Love at Peak Alarm

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