Security pricing step by step

First obtain your instructions in English

First obtain your instructions in English

Step 1 – Determine your needs and have an basic drawing and specifications of what you would like to all bidders can bid the same exact thing.

Step 2 – Only call licensed, insured Security companies that have a good rating with the Better Business Bureau. Check the Better Business Bureau Official Site

Step 3 – Check the Utah Occupational licencing web site to make sure they are a licensed company. DOPL Web site in utah

Step 4 – If you don’t have a site plan or enough knowledge to know what you need then call a reputable company that can help with that. Often companies will help with this for free although if you are going to put the project out to bid it is much better to pay a company to help with the design and the specifications. Let them know that you do not want to specify products that only one or two companies in the state can do. (Proprietary)

Step 5 – Understand there are big differences between a small commercial security system and a large commercial system. Often alarm companies will sell the small commercial systems to a medium or large business and then they don’t have expansion or all the features that may be needed. Cutting corners to save money is something that happens quite often. If you need special certifications for insurance make sure you do your homework so you will get the proper equipment installed. If you need special certifications like UL2050 and you have the wrong equipment installed it can be very costly to have equipment taken out and new equipment installed again.

Step 6 – Make sure the Alarm company you hire has the proper certifications for monitoring and installation. In Utah there are only 4 UL listed central stations that have the UUFX listing, only 5 that have the CRZH listing, only 3 that have the CPVX listing and only 3 that have the CVSG listing and only 2 that have the CRZM listing and only one local UL listed Central Station that has all 5 of these listings. (Peak Alarm) You can get on the UL web site to verify these listings. Official UL Web site

Example:

Cost of item(s)__________+ Cost of wire _________+cost of installation________+cost of conduit___________ = Actual cost

___Verify Licensing
___Verify UL listing certifications
___Verify Factory Training
___Verify code requirements for specific projects (NFPA 72, IFC, DOD, JFAN, ICD, ICS 705-1,ISPOM, UL2050 etc…..)
___Verify insurance – workers compensation – auto insurance – general liability insurance

Small installation = Simple pricing and wireless equipment – easy to price and monitor

Medium to large commercial installations – need specifications – equipment list – lift rental – site visit evaluation etc….

Call Larry Love at Peak Alarm at (801) 428 1384 Larry@peakalarm.com Peak Alarm web site

Challenges and practical applications for closed rooms and SCIFs

UL2050 certifications can be challenging

UL2050 certifications can be challenging

Challenges and practical applications for closed rooms and SCIFs is an article from TYCO that I am sharing below in it’s entirety including the TYCO contact information.

In Utah there are only 5 UL listed Central Stations that hold the CRZH UL listing that the article refers to. Peak Alarm, L3 Communications, Stanley Convergent Security Solutions, The Boeing Company and Tyco Integrated Security.

L3 Communications Web site
Tyco Official Web site
Stanley Convergent Security Solutions web site
http://www.boeing.com/

There are only two companies in Utah that hold the CRZM listing specifically to handle signals covered by the CRZH and those are Peak Alarm and Avantguard.

Avantguard Monitoring Web site

Call Larry Love at Peak Alarm (801) 428 1384 Larry@peakalarm.com for more information about UL2050, SCIF pricing and High Security systems information. http://www.peakalarm.com

www.UL.com

The accreditation of a government facility can be a challenging task. It is imperative that Federal agencies and Government contractors consider the requirements developed by the Interagency Security Committee for federally owned or leased facilities. Delays in getting a facility accredited can cost valuable resources, time and money. Even further challenges arise when facility assessments are required in order to keep up your certification and accreditation.

Consider the following three challenges and pitfalls facing Government contractors, and learn practical applications for avoiding them.

1. Contracting with an Alarm Service Provider that is not certified to meet the UL 2050 standard.

This is typically one of the most common and costly mistakes for a Facility Security Officer, or FSO, who is tasked with a tremendous amount of responsibilities in order to get a space accredited in a specified period of time. The proper certification for protecting facilities that process classified material is the National Industrial Security Systems, or CRZH listing. A security company that has CRZH certification is authorized to consult, construct, inspect, monitor and certify a Closed Room or Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) within a specified radius of about a 4-hour response time, or 200 miles.

Key application points:

When contacting an Alarm Service Provider or Security Services Company for a quote, be sure that the company has UL 2050 certification, which is different from a UL certification or a provider of UL alarm systems.

If a problem with the system is uncovered during the inspection, which is performed by a certified company, the issue could require the equipment to be removed and reinstalled by a certified company.

This process can delay the project and the accreditation, and could mean costly expenses for the FSO.

A listing of National Industrial Security Systems CRZH-listed companies can be found on www.ULalarmfinder.com.

2. Failing to obtain approval from the Cognizant Security Office and Cognizant Security Agency, or CSO/CSA, on an Intrusion Detection or Access Control system design prior to installation.

This process is a requirement in DCID 6/9 Annex B 3.1.6 and the NSIPOM section 5-901. By obtaining approval prior to installation, you can potentially avoid additional costs and time delays associated with changing the design and/or parts of the system after installation.

Key application points:

Obtain approval from the CSO/CSA for an Intrusion Detection or Access Control system prior to installation.
Since the Defense Security Service (DSS) requires a copy of the alarm company’s CRZH compliance certificate, obtain this early on in the project.
3. Utilizing the Intrusion Detection or Access Control systems for areas other than the accredited space.

Secure spaces are required not to be left with communication that is not 128 bit encrypted. Because of limitations with the hardware that most security companies use, it prevents the connection of hardware outside of the secure space.

Key application points:

Choose a company that is UL 2050 certified and familiar with the government standard so that the project is properly installed. If a technical evaluation is performed and improper wiring was installed, facility operations could be shut down until the problem is corrected, causing project delays and costs.
If there is cause for concern that an existing system is in violation, contact your provider for an examination. If the systems are connected and the communication is not encrypted, the problem should be resolved as quickly as possible in order to stay in compliance. A proactive Facility Service Officer will stay on top of possible system violations quickly.
For more information on how Tyco Integrated Security can help your agency with integrated security solutions for Closed Rooms and SCIFs, call 1.888.721.6612.

Tyco article on SCIF challenges