Utah Alarm dealers

Don’t stand still get moving

Utah has the normal alarm companies that are national such as ADT ADT site, TYCO TYCO web site, SIMPLEX Simplex Grinnell weband so on and then we have some local companies such as Mountain Alarm Mountain FPS web site and Alarm Control AC web site and Peak Alarm Local alarm dealer web site and you should always look up each one on the Better Business Bureau before you make a purchase. Some of the larger companies have thousands of complaints listed.

Simplex Grinnell is also Johnson Controls and Tyco. YOu will see that by going to their web site listed above. ADT and Protection One are also merged and are now one company. Pro 1 web site

Peak Alarm employees over 300 local people in Utah and Idaho and has been in business since 1969.

Larry Love has been in the alarm industry for over 20 years and can help you with any of your alarm needs.

Here are some of the product lines that Peak Alarm uses.

Mircom Mircom web site

Silent Knight SK web site

Fire-Lite FL Web site

DMP Web site

Bosch Security – Fire – Access – Cameras Bosch web site

FLIR Camera Systems web site

2GIG web site for 2gig

ACCESS CONTROL PRODATAKEY – Prodatakey cloud based or standalone

ACCESS CONTROL DSX DSX Web site

INTERCOM COMELIT Comelit web site

INTERCOM AIPHONE Aiphone web site

UL LISTED and CERTIFIED FOR UL2050 Installations and Monitoring Web site for UL

Better Business Bureau BBB web site check on all vendors

Peak Alarm is an experienced Alarm dealer in business since 1969 with a UL listed Central Station and Peak is the only alarm company with a full service guard and patrol company. Peak has 4 offices in Utah and Idaho.

Larry Love (801) 428 1384 Larry@peakalarm.com

Peak Alarm web site

Mircom fire alarm in Utah

Peak Alarm, Peak Guard, Peak AV, Peak Central Station

Peak Alarm is a MIRCOM Fire Alarm Dealer in Utah and Idaho.

Contact Larry Love for pricing: (801)428 1384 Larry@peakalarm.com

Peak offers CAD drawings, Fire Marshal submittals, UL listed Central Station, Full Guard Division and our Alarm Division. Peak has NICET certified techs and certified fire alarm techs.

Peak Alarm employees over 300 local employees and has been in business since 1969

Get bids from Larry Love a NICET II Fire Alarm estimator with over 20 years of experience. (801) 428 1384 larry@peakalarm.com the company web site is www.peakalarm.com

Configuring Intrusion systems and Access Control

I took this picture in Guatemala, Isabal

I took this picture in Guatemala, Isabal

Contact Larry Love for pricing and assistance with your commercial security, access, cameras and fire alarm systems. Larry@peakalarm.com (801) 428 1384 or cellular 801 898 6003 Peak Alarm web site ask for Larry Love

Example of how the Security and Access Control Systems are set up here at Peak Alarm

Here at Peak Alarm we the following configuration of systems that are set up independently of each other:

A.ACCESS CONTROL LIMITING ACCESS INTO THE BUILDING AND ALLOWING ACCESS OF CERTAIN PEOPLE INTO SPECIFIC AREAS ON TIME SCHEDULES.
B.SECURITY (INTRUSION) SYSTEMS LIMITING WHO CAN DISARM SPECIFIC AREAS DURNING SPECIFIC TIMES AND DAYS.
C.FIRE ALARM INCLUDING SMOKE DETECTION,SPRINKLER MONITORING,PULL STATIONS AND OTHER DETECTION 24/7
D.DIGITAL HIGH DEFINITION CAMERAS THAT ARE REMOTELY MONITORED AND RECORDED.
E.INTERCOM SYSTEMS

1. Peak Alarm has 2 large buildings that both have Fire Alarm, Access Control, Intrusion and Cameras.

2. Security Systems in both buildings are partitioned and manager codes can disarm anytime and other codes are limited to areas and specific times. An example of this is that Sales People cannot disarm the installation department, the shop or the accounting office but they can only disarm the sales offices. The installation department is similar that they can come in early but cannot disarm the other areas but only installation and the warehouse shop area. Some entry level or residential security systems do not have the ability to partition into areas and many of them are limited on how many users you can have so do some research before you buy so you can have a professional company do the installation the proper way.

3. Independent of the security system is the access control system. Prox cards that have been issued will allow you to open specific doors in specific areas but then you need a security code to disarm those areas. Some companies say “It would be easier if we could read our prox card and have it disarm the security system” and yes that would make things easier for you and for those trying to defeat your system if they found a prox card. It is best to keep these two systems separate. Peak Alarm can install a system that is integrated but if something happens to that system both your access control and your security system could be compromised.

4. In a separate 24 hour manned area Peak Alarm has a bank of cameras that monitored all four of our locations. This central station has bulletproof glass, a man trap. (An entry where you enter into a small hallway and cannot go out or in when one of the doors is open without approval from those inside.) The access, security, fire alarm and the cameras are monitored from this central station as well as thousands of our accounts. Peak Alarm has a large Guard Division both armed and unarmed to respond to alarms and customer concerns. One of our most valuable services is when we get temperature alarms from either vacation homes or homes of people that are on vacation. This can indicate that the heat has gone off and we can get a guard up there to help get it back on before the pipes freeze and or burst, this avoids expensive repairs to a home. Smoke Detectors are not normally tied to the security systems in most homes so we recommend that you install additional detection and we have smoke detectors that detect smoke, heat and also low temperatures.

5. Every night our main server is backed up in the other building and the server in the other building backs up to the one in the main building.

6. We have emergency generators that will kick on within seconds in a power failure and batteries that hold the power so there is no delay or loss of data in our central station. Our dispatchers will only know there has been a power outage because of an emergency light that lights up.

Larry Love has over 20 years of experience in the security industry and holds current training certificates for security, access control, cameras and fire alarm. Larry is NICET level 2 certified in Fire Alarm through the National Institute of Certification Engineering Technologies program and a Master Fire Alarm Tech with the State of Utah level three. Larry is an AXIS Certified Professional for AXIS Cameras and has passed the Bosch Access Control training which was a week long class in california to get certified in Access Control Systems. Larry is also trained and holds a 2015 Certificate for UL2050 High Security Installation design and he can help you with all your security design needs. (801) 428 1384

Peak Alarm has been in business since 1969 so over 47 years in business serving the Utah and the Idaho area. Peak has a full Guard and Patrol Division, AV Division, Security, Cameras and Access Control Division and a Full Service UL Listed Central Station that is also 5 Diamond Certified. There are only 200 UL listed Stations in the country that are also 5 Diamond Certified. This means each employees has been trained to handle emergency situations in a professional calm manner and was not just trained by answering the phone.

A+ Rating with the Better Business Bureau Better Business Bureau web site – look up zip code then company names with only 3 complaints make and closed out in the last 3 years

47 Years in Business

UL listed Central Station that is 5 Diamond Certified and UL2050 Certified

Licensed and Insured (Many companies operating do not have the proper insurance and licensing)

Factory Trained in Access Control, Fire Alarm, Mass Notification, Voice Evacuation, Intrusion, Cameras, Nurse Call and Intercom

CAD DESIGN and DESIGN DEPARTMENT WITH NICET LEVELS 3 & 4 to design, sign off and stamp your plans to submit to the fire marshal

Peak Alarm is large enough to do any type of project with over 270 employees

Peak is locally owned and operated and a NETONE company as well as ranked number 58 in the Nation in SDM Magazine

Peak can do any size project from start to finish

Peak can do any size project from start to finish


Speaker strobes and strobe voltage line drop

Trust Peak Alarm for all your security & fire alarm needs.

Trust Peak Alarm for all your security & fire alarm needs.

Speaker Strobes are installed on VOICE EVACUATION and MASS NOTIFICATION SYSTEMS to inform people of different options. Sometimes the option is to evacuate the building and other times it may be to stay put or move to another area.

Speaker Strobes have a different wiring configuration than Horn/Strobes do. Horn/Strobes are meant solely to evacuate a building. Speaker Strobes have two wires that power the strobes and two wires that power the speaker and allow the messages to be heard. Many times the wire on the speakers is shielded meaning it has like a foil type protective cover or shield around the wire to protect the cable from interference that could cause the speakers to have extra noise.

There is a power supply to power the strobes and another one to power the speaker which will have a watt draw. Most of the speakers will have an adjustment to allow them to be set at 1/4, 1/2, 1 watt etc… A 25 Watt voice evac system could handle 25 speakers set at 1 watt considering wattage affected by wire distances and also the mA draw of the strobes.

Strobes draw anywhere from 66mA to just over 200 mA on normal settings and higher when the cd (candela settings) are higher. An example of a strobe that draws 200mA would allow you to run 5 of them on a circuit with 1 amp. Many power supplies have 1.5 amp or 2 or even 2.5 amps available. Let’s say it has 2 amps available. Since each amp is 1000mA you could install ten of the 200mA strobes or so you would think. The other consideration is how far the strobe is from the power supply and what size wire you are using.

Now let’s look at how voltage line drop is figured out.

Load X Resistance = Voltage drop

(With our example of 10 strobes that have a load or mA draw of 200mA each or 2 amps together the Load is 2 so we times that by the resistance of 3.19 which I got from the NEC (NFPA 70) electrical code for 14 gauge wire and 2 x 3.19 is a voltage line drop of 6.38 volts so if we start with 24 we would end up with 17.62 and since the strobe will work from 16 VDC to 33VDC we should be fine as long as we have a 2amp circuit. Many Engineers will require a 20% buffer when they design the system so they tell you to only put 80% or in this case 8 strobes on a circuit.

When you have a power supply with 4 circuits 2 amps each then you could only put 32 strobes on one power supply and then you would need an additional power supply. The limit would be 40 so with only 32 on the power supply you can add up to 8 at a later time. These examples are using 24 Volts DC not 12.

Going back to our example of the drop there is another item to consider. Instead of counting on a voltage of 24 we start with 20.4 and then subtract our voltage line drop giving us only 14.02 which is outside the limits so then we do another calculation and find out that when we run a cable that is only 689 feet on the circuit then the voltage line drop is only 4.4 volts so we end up with over 16 volts DC at the last strobe even with a safety factor.

So you can put less strobes on a circuit to help your calculations

OR

you can shorten the cable runs to help put your calculations into the proper limits

OR

You can use a larger power supply

OR

You can find strobes that have a lower current draw

When you run 18 gauge wire (cable) normally these cables are 2 conductor and the cable is normally FPL, FPLR or FPLP and is normally SOLID copper.

18 gauge wire has a resistance of 8.08 Ohms resistance per 1000′ so you could install up to 5 strobes on a circuit that was 545 feet and have a voltage line drop of 4.4 volts. So you can see that installing 18 gauge cable for strobes is not the best option. The 14 gauge wire is a better choice.

Many people say then let’s use 10 gauge or 12 gauge cable and the figures will be better and that sounds reasonable although 10 gauge cable does not fit under the strobe terminals and 12 gauge is very difficult to work with. Sometimes you can make pigtails from the higher gauge cable to a lower size although this can cause issues at a later date.

Keep in mind when you have to install class A circuits that most of the time you would loose 2 of the 4 circuits on the power supply so you would need double the power supplies. Some manufacturers allow you to keep all four circuits. FireLite has some power supplies where you don’t loose the other two circuits when you add special modules.

http://www.peakalarm.com

Call Larry Love in Salt Lake City Utah for more information (801) 428 1384 Larry@peakalarm.com

http://wwwsystemsensor.com